Cilantro Lime Coleslaw

Purple and White Cabbage

Today’s recipe made an appearance at my brother’s birthday bash this past weekend and while it can certainly stand alone as a perfectly seductive side, I choose to used it as a topping for a saucy pulled pork sandwich.  Sadly, you won’t find the pulled pork recipe in this post; I’m saving that for later.   I thought I’d get the less interesting component out of the way first and wow you with the sandwich later.

Shredded Carrots

I’m trying to build hype.  Is it working?

I also thought you might like a break from the boozy decadence that has recently invaded my blog, much to the chagrin of my waistband.   I thought this might be a good way to illustrate that I do still possess a small amount of will power and I’m still as health conscious as ever… just ignore the fact that this coleslaw dressing is mayonnaise based.  Okay?

Green Onions

Look!  Green things!  Aren’t you proud?!

I apologize for pulling the whole annoying cliffhanger thing on you, but I promise you’ll get closure eventually.  This won’t be anything like the last episode of My So Called Life. I promise I will not leave you with endless questions that wind up haunting you for an embarrassingly long time.

Seriously!  Did she choose Jordan or Brian?!  Someone has to tell me!

Cilantro Lime Dressing

Not only does this zippy little coleslaw contain all the makings of a damn good slaw, it has a few finer details.  The dressing contains jalapenos and cilantro, the slaw itself is studded with pepitas and the dish is accented with a splash of lime juice that brightens the overall flavor.  The pepitas deliver a different kind of crunch than the cabbage, making for a very satisfying contrast of textures.  I’ve never put nuts or seeds in any of my coleslaws before, but I can guarantee you this will not be the last time I do.  The jalapenos deliver a hint of spiciness, while the cilantro is savory and cooling.  All in all this taste profile makes for a very interesting slaw, one that I will no doubt be repeating over and over again.

Pepitas

This coleslaw was made for the summer and with the summer days threatening to leave us for another whole year, I suggest you strike while the iron is hot (believe me, it really is hot, my air conditioner is broken) and whip this little number up for you and your lucky dinner guests.

Pulled Pork Sandwich with Cilantro Lime Coleslaw

Give it a try!

Cilantro Lime Coleslaw: Serves 12

½ purple cabbage, chopped

½ white cabbage, chopped

2 cups carrots, shredded

½ cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped

12 stalks green onion, sliced

2 jalapenos, diced

1 cup unsalted pepitas

1 cup of buttermilk

½ cup mayonnaise (I used Hellman’s Olive Oil Mayo)

3 tbsp sweet relish

1 tbsp vinegar

Juice of one lime

Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions:

In a large bowl toss cabbage, carrots, green onions and pepitas together until combined. Set aside.

In a small bowl whisk together, mayonnaise, buttermilk, jalapenos, cilantro, lime juice, relish and vinegar until combined.

Pour dressing over the vegetables and toss to combine.

Taste and season with salt and pepper according to preference.

Chill until ready to serve.

Asian BBQ Pork Tenderloin

BBQ'd Pork Tenderloin

I’ve been back in Nova Scotia for a week now and I am happy to report I have been cooking up a storm. We’ve been in Halifax for just a few days and my mother and I have already developed a lovely daily ritual. It starts with a run in the morning (to combat all we’ve been eating), shopping in the afternoon (consequently, I’m broke) and an evening of white wine and cooking. The success of our cooking is often dependent on the amount of wine we drink, but for the most part our culinary exploits have yielded some amazing results. I’m sorry to keep so many wonderful recipes from you, but I’ve been too busy catching up and bonding with my mom to be incessantly snapping photos. My ravenous family also seems to object to waiting for their food while I try to get a glamour shot out of it.
Ginger, garlic, green onion

This pork tenderloin, on the other hand, was just too good! I felt obligated to share it with you. It’s actually apart of a much larger recipe but, you’ll have to wait on that, I’m still trying to wrap my head around it.

Marinade

My mother cooked a lot of Asian-inspired dishes while I was growing up. How a woman from PEI managed to accumulate such an impressive repertoire of Asian recipes is beyond me, but this book may have something to do with it.

Many of my childhood favorites were adapted from this book and I’m pretty sure this picture is responsible for my melon ball obsession.

 

My mother never strove for authenticity, she strove for flavor. I’ve never seen someone so fearless in the kitchen. A quick taste and she knows exactly what to do. There is no second-guessing or thinking out loud, just a swift movement to the fridge or cabinet to track down exactly what the recipe needs.
Marinaded Pork Tenderloin

This pork tenderloin was intended to be char sui, despite being the wrong cut of meat for such an occupation. That intent quickly went out the window. My mother’s fridge is always stocked with any Asian condiment you could think of, so like a kid in candy store I let my taste be my guide and this is what I came up with. My mother ensured it was BBQ’d to perfection and it was easily the most beautifully cooked piece of pork I’ve had in a long time.
Asian BBQ'd Pork Tenderloin

While it’s certainly not authentic Chinese fare, it’s exactly like most of the food I grew up on. It’s no wonder I have such a love for fusion cuisine. Be sure to give it a try before BBQ season is over.
BBQ'd Pork Tenderloin

Enjoy!

Asian Inspired BBQ Pork Tenderloin: Serves 4
1 ¼ pound pork tenderloin
¼ cup soy sauce
2 tbsp fresh ginger, minced
1/4 cup green onion, sliced
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp sesame oil
2 tbsp hoisin sauce
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp honey
2 tsp sriracha sauce

Directions:
Combine all ingredients except pork in a small bowl and whisk to combine.
Place tenderloin in a large zip-lock bag and pour marinade over the meat.
Let it marinate in the fridge for at least an hour. Overnight is better.
When ready to cook turn your BBQ to high heat.
Remove pork from marinade and pat dry.
Reserve the marinade for basting.
Sear the tenderloin on all sides. About three minutes a side for a total of 12 minutes.
Reduce heat to medium and cook for an additional 12 minutes. Continue to rotate the meat every three minutes, basting often.
Remove meat from heat and tent with tin foil and leave to rest for ten minutes.
Slice and serve.